This week I finally had a chance to read Riley Sager’s Lock Every Door. I had read one of her other novels (Final Girls) earlier this year as part of the POPSUGAR Reading Challenge and really enjoyed her writing style, so I was excited to dive into her newest book. Lock Every Door is a very suspenseful read; one that might have you double checking the locks on your doors before going to bed.

Having lost both her job and her boyfriend in the same day, Jules Larsen has been reduced to living on her best friend’s couch as she hunts for a new job. When she’s offered a position as an apartment sitter at the famous Bartholomew apartment building, Jules jumps at the opportunity. The rules for apartment sitters seem a bit strict, but for the chance to live in the apartment where her favorite book was set, Jules is prepared to follow them. The money she’s being paid to live there for the next three months is also a pretty good incentive.

Jules hasn’t lived at the Bartholomew for very long when things start to take a sinister turn. It begins with a scream in the middle of the night, and then the sudden disappearance of Ingrid, one of the other apartment sitters. Jules is determined to find out what happened to her, but the closer she gets to the truth, the more danger she’s in.

What makes this story so suspenseful is the way in which it is told. The book begins with Jules waking up in the hospital, having been hit by a car outside of her apartment building. Then the book goes back to events that occurred six days earlier. Every few chapters, the audience learns more about what is happening in the present, while the rest of the book counts down the number of days Jules spends at the Bartholomew. It wasn’t long before I found myself unable to put the book down, needing to know what had happened to Jules.

If you’re looking for a suspenseful, fast read, Lock Every Door is a great choice. For those of you who are in the process of finishing up the POPSUGAR Reading Challenge, the novel does work well for a couple of prompts, including “a book that’s published in 2019” and “a book that you think should be turned into a movie.”

If you have the opportunity to read Lock Every Door, I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

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